Nazarene Missions International Handbook

Global Edition

Introduction

This Handbook for Nazarene Missions International (NMI) is a global version for use by

Nazarene churches beyond the USA/Canada Region. The purpose and objectives of NMI are the same for all regions of our global church. However, many details to fulfill the purpose and objectives have been simplified or omitted in this global version.

References to the NMI Constitution are included as chapter endnotes in this edition. The Global NMI Office team and the Global NMI Council intend to make it easier for every church worldwide to be a part of the NMI family. They desire that all churches will participate in God’s mission to reach people in every nation, culture, and language with the Gospel.

Chapter 1

Nazarene Missions International

Nazarene Missions International is the core or heart of Global Mission in every local church worldwide. NMI works closely with Global Mission at all levels of the church— local, district, field, regional, and global. NMI functions according to this Handbook and according to guidance from district and regional, and global leaders.

Purpose

The purpose of NMI is to move the church forward in mission through praying, discipling, giving, and educating.

Objectives

1.Praying—interceding for leaders and churches and for the Holy Spirit to draw all people to Christ.

2.Discipling—involving and mentoring future missions leaders, especially youth and children, to make Christlike disciples in the nations.

3.Giving—devoting ourselves and our resources, especially the World Evangelism Fund, to extend Christ’s kingdom.

4.Educating—informing people of the world’s needs and enabling our church to meet those needs in Christ.

Local Church NMI

How to Organize

The pastor should conduct a meeting of the congregation at which the people learn

about the purpose and objectives of NMI. If possible, select or elect an NMI president or leader. Also, select others to assist the president and pastor.1

The pastor and NMI president should request guidance from the district and region.

1

These offices can provide information and resources to help the local church.

The local NMI council should work throughout the year to fulfill the NMI purpose and objectives. The president or pastor submits an NMI report at the end of the church year about the work of the NMI.

Membership

Identify local NMI members, as this will make the NMI a stronger and more effective organization.2

Encourage any adult, youth, and child to join NMI.3 Local churches may consider every church member an NMI member. All church attendees who are not church members may become associate members of NMI.

The NMI president and pastor work together to determine the number of NMI members for the pastor’s report to the district assembly.

Annual Meeting

Hold an annual meeting for NMI members.4 This meeting may be held at the same time as the church’s annual meeting. The pastor or NMI president presides at the annual NMI meeting.

The annual meeting is a time when the church reviews the work of the NMI during the past year. The NMI president and other council members may be selected for

the next church year. Also, delegates are elected for the district NMI meeting, if such a meeting is held on the district.5

Church Mission Experiences

Here are a few suggestions to help create a mission-focused church:

Pray for guidance in fulfilling the NMI purpose and objectives

Meet with the NMI council or other church leaders to determine the plans and strategies that will best accomplish the NMI purpose and objectives in your local congregation.

Develop mission action and atmosphere in the congregation. Help people know that the church has global responsibility.

Include all age groups. Involve children and youth in local and global missions.

Use every opportunity to educate the congregation about missions.6 Use every means possible, including resources provided by the district and region.

Consider conducting a monthly missions emphasis as a part of a worship service or a Sunday School class.

Relation to Other Church Entities

NMI is the “face” of missions in the local church.

The NMI president is a member of the church board.

Nazarene Youth International (NYI) and children’s ministry leaders are partners in local and global missions.

NMI leaders work with other church leaders to help emphasize missions in the church.

2

Mission Priority One

A Strategy to Fulfill NMI Objectives

Consistent with our denomination globally, NMI also believes in accountability.

Mission Priority One (MPO) is the NMI strategy that demonstrates a church’s mission priority. The four MPO goals are based on the four NMI objectives.

The NMI president or pastor keeps a record of participation in the four NMI objectives throughout the year. At the end of the year, the local NMI president may be asked to submit a report to the church and the district, including how well the church achieved MPO goals.

MPO Opportunities

Praying

Objective: Interceding for leaders and churches and for the Holy Spirit to draw all people to Christ.

Provide regular prayer requests to the church. Possible sources are Prayer

Mobilization Line by e-mail, the NMI Web site, missionaries’ newsletters, personal contact with missionaries, district or region requests.

Engage every age group and all small groups in praying regularly for missions requests.

Emphasize praying with fasting. Fasting can include food, time, places, favorites, etc.

Discipling

Objective: Involving and mentoring future missions leaders, especially youth and children, to make Christlike disciples in the nations.

Involve and mentor youth and children to become devoted followers of Christ.

Encourage children and youth who sense God’s call to missionary service to talk with local church leaders (pastor, NMI president, Sunday School teacher, etc.).

Use available resources to educate children and youth about global missions.

Plan for a visiting missionary or mission speaker to meet with children and youth.

Encourage children and youth to give to missions, especially to the World Evangelism Fund.

Giving

Objective: Devoting ourselves and our resources, especially the World Evangelism

Fund, to extend Christ’s kingdom.

Each local church globally gives a least 5.5 percent of current income for the World

Evangelism Fund (WEF). Send this amount regularly.

Promote Easter and Thanksgiving or Harvest offerings.

Plan a Faith Promise mission event (see Chapter 4 for more information).

Send WEF giving weekly or monthly to the appropriate location.

§U.S.A. churches send WEF as soon as it is given to Global Treasury Services.

§Canada churches send WEF as soon as it is given to Canada National Office.

§All other regions send WEF as soon as it is given through the established district

3

and regional finance system and marked appropriately for WEF. Contact your district NMI president for more details.

Educating

Objective: Informing people of the world’s needs and enabling our church to meet those needs in Christ.

Use mission resources from the NMI Web site and from your district and region.

Participate in local mission projects.

Provide opportunities for the congregation to hear mission speakers or to interact with them.

Make NMI books available to the congregation if possible.

Local Church Mission Priority One Requirements

1.The church prayed for missions.

2.The church involved children and youth in local and global missions.

3.The church gave at least 5.5 percent of income for the WEF.

4.The church participated in activities that inform the congregation about Nazarene missions.

Local Church NMI Council

The NMI president and council serve with the pastor as the mission strategy team. The council meets to plan, share ideas, and report progress.7

The council is responsible to promote and fulfill the NMI purpose and objectives— praying, discipling, giving, and educating.8

Start with a council of few members. Other members may be added as the church and the work of missions grow.

Council members may be assigned to work with specific objectives: praying, discipling, giving, and educating. Council members may also be assigned to other

missions emphases, such as Alabaster, Compassionate Ministries JESUS Film, World Mission Broadcast.9

District NMI Council

The district NMI president and council serve with the district superintendent and

local churches to promote missions throughout the churches on the district. The council meets to plan, share ideas, and report progress.10

The council is responsible to promote and fulfill the NMI purpose and objectives— praying, discipling, giving, and educating.11

The council is composed of the president and other elected and appointed members.

Council members may be assigned to work with specific objectives: praying, discipling, giving, and educating. Council members may also be assigned to other

missions emphases, such as Alabaster, Compassionate Ministries JESUS Film, World Mission Broadcast.12

The district secretary compiles statistics for the district NMI based on information

4

received from local churches.

District NMI Convention

The district NMI convention or meeting is a time of spiritual renewal, mission inspiration and information, and conducting business. The district president and the district council provide a report of what has been done during the past year and a vision and goals for the next year.

Include children and youth in the convention as a way to disciple and mentor them.

Collaborate with other groups such as NYI to plan convention timing, location, and ideas.

District Mission Priority One Requirements

1.90 percent of churches prayed for missions.

2.90 percent of churches involved children and youth in missions.

3.90 percent of the WEF goal of 5.5 percent of current income was received and sent.

4.90 percent of churches participated in activities that inform the congregations about

Nazarene missions.

Regional Leadership and Meetings

Two regional NMI leaders serve on all regions except USA/Canada: the regional Global NMI Council representative and the regional NMI coordinator. The Council representative is elected at the Global NMI Convention13, and the regional coordinator is appointed by the region. These people speak for the regions to leadership on the global level and also help with training within the regions.

Occasionally regional conferences will be hosted by the regional leadership, and often NMI will train district and local NMI leaders at the conferences. Leaders are advised to learn when the conference will be and attend, if possible. If attendance is not possible, ask the Global Council representative and the regional coordinator for any NMI resources that may have been distributed at the conference.

Contact the regional NMI leaders for information about where and when to send missions offerings and if there are any other regional NMI guidelines.

Global NMI Council

The Global NMI Council serves in collaboration with the General Board, Global Mission director, and regional directors. The council is a global mission strategy team to promote the NMI purpose and objectives with the leadership of the global

NMI director and global NMI president.

The council should meet at least three times during the quadrennium for planning, exchange of ideas, reports of progress, and conducting business.14

Council Officers and Members: The Global Council is composed of the director of

5

Global Mission, global NMI director, global NMI president, and one representative from each region of the Church of the Nazarene. Each Global Council member is responsible to promote the purpose and objectives of NMI with the leadership of the global NMI director and global NMI president working together with the regional NMI coordinator.

Executive Committee: The executive committee is composed of the director of

Global Mission, the global NMI director, global NMI president, the global NMI vice

president, the global NMI secretary, and one other council member. The executive committee conducts business between council meetings.15

Resources

NMI Handbook and Constitution is updated each quadrennium.

NMI Web Site <www.nazarenemissions.org> is an online resource with lots of information about NMI objectives and strategies for meeting those objectives.

Mission Connection is an online monthly magazine, sent to people’s e-mail with information about NMI purpose and objectives. To subscribe, go to www.nazarene.org/subscriber.html and click on Mission Connection. After filling out the information, be sure to 1) press the “save” button at the bottom of the page, and

2) reply to the e-mail sent to your inbox to active your account.

Engage Magazine is an online mission magazine with stories, reports, photos, etc., about current issues in global missions. To subscribe, go to www.engagemagazine.com or go to www.nazarene.org/subscriber.html and click on

Engage Magazine.

Endnotes

1.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1

2.NMI Constitution, Article IV

3.NMI Constitution, Article II

4.NMI Constitution, Article VI, Section 1.B.

5.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1.C.

6.NMI Constitution, Article VI, Section 1.A.

7.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1.A., and Article VI, Section 1.C.

8.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1.B.2.

9.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1, D.

10.NMI Constitution, Article VI, Section 2.B.

11.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 2.B.2.

12.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 2.D.

13.NMI Constitution, Article III, Section 3

14.NMI Constitution, Article VI, Section 3.B.

15.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 3.D.1.

6

Chapter 2

Praying

“The prayer of the righteous is powerful and effective (James 5:16, NRSV)

The first objective of NMI is: Praying—Interceding for leaders and churches and for the Holy Spirit to draw all people to Christ.

Prayer is essential for the work of global evangelization. The Great Commission can be fulfilled as God’s people intercede and as churches become houses of prayer for all nations.

Recommendations for Implementing Prayer

Pray daily as a part of a personal devotional life.

Encourage every church to become a house of prayer for all nations.

Urge all members to pray individually, in small groups, and in times of worship for mission needs.

Provide mission prayer requests to the congregation.

Request that the pastor regularly include global missions prayer needs in pastoral prayers.

Prayer and Fasting

Prayer with fasting is a biblical spiritual discipline. See Acts 13:2 and Acts 14:32.

Encourage members to pray with fasting, denying self, as the Holy Spirit directs.

Fasting may include refraining from food for one meal or for a period of time. Fasting may also include abstaining from specific foods, preferences, favorites, places, etc.

Fasting also motivates giving. Some congregations use Prayer and Fasting offerings for the World Evangelism Fund.

Prayer Mobilization Line

The Prayer Mobilization Line (PML) is a current and valuable resource for Nazarene global prayer needs and praises.

Churches or individuals may access the PML or subscribe to PML by going to the

NMI Web site at www.nazarenemissions.org. Click on “Praying.”

PML also has a Facebook page <www.facebook.com/NMIPrayer>. It is designed to be a meeting place for the global church to share prayer requests and praises.

Here are some specific ways to pray for global missions:

JESUS Film Harvest Partners. The JESUS Film ministry is an important means of evangelization. The JESUS Film ministry relies on the prayers of Nazarenes to continue reaching lost people. You can learn about the JESUS Film by going to its

Web site at www.jfhp.org. You may get the weekly “Prayer and Praise” report on their Web site, or you may receive this report by e-mail.

Nazarene World Week of Prayer. This is an annual event during the first week surrounding the first Friday in March when Nazarenes pray for the global church.

7

You can get specific prayer requests from around the world on the Prayer Mobilization Line.

Prayer for the Persecuted Church. Prayer for our brothers and sisters in Christ who are suffering for the cause of Christ should be part of regular intercession.

Numerous global Web sites are available that provide requests for the persecuted church.

10/40 Window. This area of the world includes northern Africa, the Middle East, and southern Asia. Many of the world’s least-reached people live in this area. Pray for this part of the world regularly and that Nazarenes will be able to reach these people with the Gospel. Learn more about the 10/40 Window on the NMI Web site.

Global Day of Prayer—Pentecost Sunday. The prayer focus includes 10 days of day-and-night prayer leading up to Pentecost. Learn more about the Global Day of

Prayer on the NMI Web site. Click on “Praying.”

National Day of Prayer. Many countries have a national day of prayer. Find out when this day is scheduled, and use this day as a time to focus on reaching lost people in that nation.

Concerts of Prayer. A concert of prayer is a structured prayer time during a service when people gather to focus on intercession. Learn more about the Concerts of

Prayer on the NMI Web site. Click on “Praying”, then “Prayer and Fasting.” Concert of prayer resources are located at the bottom of that page.

Prayer Walks. A group of intercessors walk through a community praying for the people who live and/or work in that area.

Resources

NMI Web site <www.nazarenemissions.org>

JESUS Film Web site <www.jfhp.org>

Prayer for the Persecuted Church Web site <www.idop.org>

Global Day of Prayer Web site <www.globaldayofprayer.com>

8

Chapter 3

Discipling

“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations . . .

teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you (Matthew 28:19-20, NIV)

The second objective of NMI is: Discipling—Involving and mentoring future missions leaders, especially youth and children, to make Christlike disciples for God’s mission in the nations.

NMI is committed to discipling all generations, focusing on children and youth, encouraging them to be mission-minded and mission leaders. Discipling includes teaching young leaders about Christ’s global mission and nurturing their mission passion.

Mentoring and Developing Leaders

NMI needs leaders in every generation to equip, disciple, and mentor next generations. Therefore, NMI leaders in every church and district should develop a plan toward reaching this goal. Consider these ideas:

Identify people of all age groups who indicate an interest in global missions.

Select developing leaders of all age groups to serve on the NMI council.

Encourage and involve new people in mission events and strategies.

Include children and youth in all missions activities.

Children and Youth

NMI recognizes that a person’s worldview and interests are shaped and developed in early years. Therefore, NMI emphasizes children and youth in this second objective. NMI engages children and youth now as we look to the future. NMI challenges children and youth to:

Commit themselves to God—to know Him through the person of Jesus Christ.

Commit themselves to God’s mission—to learn about global missions and the people who carry on that mission.

Connecting a New Generation

Statistics indicate that 50 percent of the world’s population is under the age of 24, and 30 percent is under the age of 15. Therefore, next generations include children, teens, and young adults who are under age 24. NMI engages this age group with passion to accomplish what Christ commanded in the Great Commission.

Next generations can be identified with the word “passion.” Even with the many problems they have in their own cultures, they tend to commit themselves totally to all they do. Therefore, the church and NMI must help next generations to be passionate about God and His mission.

Consider these important steps to create passion in next generations:

9

§Be there. They need people whom they can count on and who demonstrate an interest in them.

§Be passionate. They want people to be authentic and real. Mission leaders need to passionate to help others develop a passion for missions.

§Be community. They want to belong and feel that they are important in God’s mission. Being with other Christians helps to develop a sense of belonging.

Developing Tomorrow’s Missionaries (Mission Call)

The majority of missionaries testify that they first felt God’s call for global service as a child or youth. Therefore, the church should help each child and youth who senses God’s call to be encouraged and mentored. Here are some ways that can be done:

§Help them develop a relationship with God through their own Bible study, prayer, and worship.

§Help them become involved in the life of the church.

§Help them learn about the global church and mission needs.

§Help them develop their God-given gifts and abilities.

§To learn more, go to the NMI Web site at www.nazarenemissions.org and click on

“Discipling.”

§NMI recommends that local churches select a person to mentor children and youth in their mission calls.

Organization

Next generation groups will vary among local churches. However, NMI recommends that churches select persons who will care for both children and youth. The

individuals should provide appropriate materials and activities for them, including mission education.1

Include children and youth in the membership of NMI. Their membership should be included in the local NMI president’s report.2

Plan mission gatherings or activities for next generations as often as possible.3 NMI recommends that such meetings be held once a month.

Select mission leaders for next generations who have these qualifications:4

§They have a love for children and youth.

§They have a vital interest in Nazarene global missions.

§They can work in cooperation with the NMI president and council.

§They can help with mentoring and discipling next generations.

Mission Education

Resources that are appropriate for children and youth are important for mission education. Such materials will help them learn about the world and mission needs and opportunities.

Consider these ideas for promoting global awareness with next generations:

§Plan regular mission activities for next generations. Call it “Maximum Mission” or another creative title. Use this time to connect with them about what God is doing globally.

§Include next generations in meetings when missionaries or mission speakers talk

10

with the congregation. Arrange for these speakers to meet with children and youth at a separate time.

§Engage next generations in hands-on missions projects, activities, and trips. Ask the pastor or youth leader to help in planning these events.

§Include next generations in community and outreach ministries of the church.

§Check the NMI Web site for additional ideas. Go to www.nazarenemissions.org and click on “Discipling.”

Praying

Involve next generations in all prayer emphases in the church.

Develop personal connections with missionaries or others involved in outreach ministries. Personal relationships motivate praying.

Help GenNEXT to identify global needs reported in news.

Share appropriate requests from Prayer Mobilization Line, the JESUS Film, and other sources.

Giving

Encourage GenNEXT to participate in giving through:

§Easter and Thanksgiving or Harvest Offerings

§Alabaster Offerings

§Nazarene Compassionate Ministries

§Other mission offerings and projects

Hands-on Mission Experiences for Youth

The Church of the Nazarene has long recognized that youth and young adults need to be involved in global mission. There are several ways this can be done. We encourage churches, districts, and regions to be creative in finding ways their GenNEXT can become personally involved in hands-on missions. Consider these ideas:

Encourage youth to attend summer camps. In many of these camps missionaries are there to speak and interact with the youth.

Sponsor youth who lack funds to participate in summer camps.

Engage youth in community projects.

Conduct a fund-raiser for a missions project.

When possible, help next generations to participate in Youth in Mission (YIM) trips for college/university students or Mission Immersion trips for those who sense a call to missions. Some world regions have sponsored YIM and Mission Immersion trips.

Volunteer Missions

Mission Corps

Mission Corps is designed for people of all ages to serve in missions in another world area for three months or longer. These volunteers use their skills and gifts in Nazarene mission.

Mission Corps volunteers provide their own financial support or raise their support

11

through families, friends, and churches.

Interested people should check with their regional office about Mission Corps opportunities. Or go to the Mission Corps Web site <www.missioncorps.org>.

Tentmakers

Tentmakers are people whose jobs lead them to another culture or world area. Their jobs support them while they share Jesus with others around them.

Interested people should check with their regional office about Tentmaker opportunities or go to the Mission Corps Web site <www.missioncorps.org>.

Work & Witness

In the Church of the Nazarene, Work & Witness means short-term mission experiences for three weeks or less. People of all ages are able to participate first- hand in global missions.

Work & Witness (W&W) is about building a church, school, clinic, or home, as well as building relationships, spiritual growth, Christian stewardship, and a Christian worldview.

W&W projects can take place anywhere there is a need: in a local community nearby, on a district, in the same country, or in a distant land. For possible projects, check with your district or regional office or go to the W&W Web site at www.workandwitness.org.

W&W connects teams with a variety of needs. Teams of two or more people provide construction, medical, technical, and evangelistic assistance. Consider one of these ideas:

§Local projects are planned by one church, or a church may partner with two or more churches for a project. The church or churches raise the money for all of the project expenses.

§District projects are planned by a district, which recruits members from the churches on the district. The district helps to raise the money for all of the project expenses.

§JESUS Film Ministry Trips may be a local, district, or regional project. Money is raised to buy and deliver JESUS Film equipment. For more information, go to the JESUS Film Web site at www.jfhp.org and click on “Get Involved.”

§Extreme Nazarene Missions meets global needs and includes people from around the world. For more information, go to the Web site at www.extremenazarene.org.

Finances. There are two major costs related with most W&W projects:

§The costs related to construction materials, medical supplies, school supplies, JESUS Film equipment, or whatever is needed at the W&W project site.

§The team’s expense for travel, food, housing, insurance, and other miscellaneous expenses

W&W Guidelines

A church is eligible to sponsor a W&W project after that church gives at least 5.5 percent of current income for the World Evangelism Fund.

12

A district is eligible to sponsor a W&W project after the churches on that district give collectively at least 90 percent of the district’s total World Evangelism goal.

All W&W projects are approved at the district, field (not in USA/Canada Region), and regional levels before being added to the approved global project list.

All W&W projects that cross district lines or take place in another country should be approved first and then registered with the W&W Office at the Global Ministry Center.

Insurance obtained through the W&W Office at the Global Ministry Center is required for all approved W&W projects.

The Church of the Nazarene will not be responsible for W&W teams or individuals that have not coordinated with the W&W Office and paid the required insurance.

Official W&W project funds should be sent to the Global Treasury Services three months before departure. This is necessary to process funds and allows sufficient time to purchase materials before the team’s arrival at the project site. For teams outside the U.S.A., please contact the W&W Office at www.workandwitness.org to make arrangements for payment.

Resources

Work & Witness Web site: www.workandwitness.org. This site has a wealth of information, including online forms and a downloadable resource guide.

NMI Web site: www.nazarenemissions.org

Mission Corps and Tentmaker Web site: www.missioncorps.org

JESUS Film Ministry Trips Web site: www.jfhp.org/getinvolved/trips.cfm

Extreme Nazarene Missions Web site: www.extremenazarene.org

Youth in Mission Web site: www.youthinmission.org

Endnotes

1.NMI Constitution, Article III, Section 1.

2.NMI Constitution, Article IV.

3.NMI Constitution, Article VI, Section 1.A.

4.NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1.C.2.

13

Chapter 4

Giving

“For, as I can testify, they voluntarily gave according to their means, and even beyond their means” (2 Corinthians 8:3, NRSV)

“Each of you must give as you have made up your mind, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver (2 Corinthians 9:7, NRSV)

The third objective of NMI is: Giving—Devoting ourselves and our resources, especially the World Evangelism Fund, to extend Christ’s kingdom.

Giving, especially sacrificial giving, is necessary for the global mission of the Church of the Nazarene. NMI is charged with the responsibility of helping to raise funds for the global mission of the church. Therefore, NMI recommends the following:

Money raised for global missions should never be used for any purpose other than that for which it was given.

Prompt sending of all funds to the designated persons or office is very important.

Local Church Ministries

Money may be needed to operate the local church NMI, such as for special speakers, local missions projects, supplies and resources, etc.

Local expense money is usually obtained by receiving offerings or as an item in the church budget.

District Ministries

Money is needed to operate the cost of district NMI ministry, such as the district convention, various resources, regional expenses, Global NMI Convention delegate expenses, etc.

The district can determine how to fund the district NMI ministry. Some suggestions include: local churches contribute a designated amount, local churches take a special offering, the district designates money from its budget, etc.

Global Ministries

World Evangelism Fund

The World Evangelism Fund (WEF) is vital to the global mission of the Church of the Nazarene. The WEF is the collaborative and essential lifeline for the total outreach of the church around the world.

With the WEF, we do more together than we ever do alone. This is connectional commitment.

Each local church should consider the WEF as the most important giving to global mission. Approved Mission Specials, such as Alabaster and Nazarene Compassionate Ministries, should be given beyond the WEF goal.

14

The new giving goal for the WEF is at least 5.5 percent of the church’s income.

This goal is the same for all churches in all world regions.

Special offerings, such as Easter and Thanksgiving (Harvest) Offerings, help raise the WEF. Churches may also use Prayer and Fasting offerings or Faith Promise giving to pay the WEF. A church may also give 5.5 percent of its income from regular tithes and offerings.

The General Board determines the distribution of the WEF. The largest share of the WEF is invested in global evangelization.

Field-related Operation and Missionary Benefits. The following is a partial list of what the Global Mission amount of WEF is used for:

Missionaries: salaries, travel expenses, education allowance, pension plan, health insurance and care, etc.

Support and operation of churches, schools, hospitals, clinics, etc.

Church planting and development

Building and property maintenance

Workshops and training

Recognition: NMI recognizes local churches and districts that reach giving goals for the WEF.

World Evangelism Church: Churches that give at least 5.5 percent of their income to WEF have met the minimum goal in their support of global missions. These churches are the lifeblood of the Church of the Nazarene’s mission to the nations.

World Evangelism Church of Excellence: Churches that give at least 5.7 percent to WEF.

World Evangelism District of Excellence: Districts that give at least 90 percent of the WEF goal (5.5 percent) have met the minimum total in their support of the global mission as a district.

Approved Mission Specials Offerings

NMI promotes special offerings for the mission. Offerings given to Approved Mission Specials are over and beyond the WEF. These special offerings provide valuable support for missionaries, nationals, and other leaders globally. When a church gives these offerings through the appropriate channels (see page 16), that church will receive credit toward 10 Percent recognition.

NMI places a priority on the following Approved Missions Specials. NMI encourages each local church to determine the most effective ways and times to receive each of these vital offerings.

§Alabaster Offering—Invested only for buildings and property.

§World Mission Broadcast—Provides electronic media broadcasts of the Gospel throughout the world.

§Missionary Care—Supports the health care and personal needs of missionaries through special offerings and other giving opportunities. This combines LINKS, Missionary Christmas Fund, Distinguished Service Award, and Memorial Roll.

15

§Other Approved Missions Specials—Global Mission partners continue to promote other Approved Mission Specials, such as Nazarene Compassionate

Ministries, JESUS Film, Work & Witness, etc.

Sometimes a missionary visits churches to speak about their mission work.

Churches should receive an offering for these missionaries, if possible.

Local churches and districts can choose which offerings to support and how they will raise the money. They should send the money through offices determined by the regions and districts.

Faith Promise

Some churches use the Faith Promise plan for financial support of global missions.

What is Faith Promise? The local church challenges people to make an annual Faith Promise commitment for Nazarene missions globally. Faith is essential: the church encourages all to seek God’s will for the amount they will promise to give by faith. The total commitment is given according to the individual’s preference and as God provides—weekly, monthly, or as a one-time gift.

Faith Promise Guidelines

Faith Promise money should be for missions, primarily for global evangelism.

Faith Promise does not need to replace other mission offerings, such as Easter Offering, for WEF. The people who have not made Faith Promise commitments should be given the opportunity to participate in these offerings.

Faith Promise money may also include amounts for Approved Mission Specials; however, NMI recommends that churches give people the opportunity to participate in these offerings also.

Faith Promise may include local and district NMI expense money.

Faith Promise does not include other church expenses, such as pastor’s salary, building expenses, etc.

The confidence of the people should not be broken.

Faith Promise Policies

The World Evangelism Fund should be given in full and before considering Approved Mission Specials.

Faith Promise money should be used solely for mission endeavors.

All Faith Promise offerings should be accounted for through the local NMI treasurer or the unified church treasurer.

Local Church NMI Treasurer

The NMI Constitution provides that the NMI treasurer may be elected or may be the unified church treasurer1.

Record keeping

No matter how small the church or amount of money involved, accurate and detailed

16

records of all money, including monies received and disbursed, should be kept.

The local NMI treasurer needs to give an accurate financial report to the pastor for his or her report to the district assembly.

If a unified treasurer system is used, that person is responsible for keeping records of all NMI monies. If there is an NMI treasurer and unified treasurer, the two persons should collaborate on NMI financial records.

Disbursing funds: Sending funds to the right office or location can save time and will avoid problems with accounting.

Africa, Asia-Pacific, Eurasia, Mesoamerica, and South America Regions: Send all money to the regional office, where funds will be forwarded to Global Treasury Services at the Global Ministry Center.

Canada: Make all checks payable to “Church of the Nazarene Canada.” Send to Church of the Nazarene Canada, 20 Regan Road, Unit 9, Brampton, ON L74 1C3,

CANADA.

United States: Instructions for U.S.A. churches are included in the full version of the NMI Handbook.

Resources

NMI Web site <www.nazarenemissions.org>

Church of the Nazarene Web site <www.nazarene.org>

Stewardship Web site <www.nazarene.org> and click on “Stewardship”

JESUS Film Harvest Partners Web site <www.jfhp.org>

Endnotes

1. NMI Constitution, Article V, Section 1.C.2. and D.4.

17

Chapter 5

Educating

“Those who accepted his message were baptized,

and about three thousand were added to their number that day.

They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer” (Act 2:41-42, NIV, emphasis added).

“Therefore go and make disciples… of all nations teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you”

(Matthew 28:19a-20a, NIV, emphasis added).

The fourth objective of NMI is: Educating—Informing people of the world’s needs and enabling our church to meet those needs in Christ.

Education is the foundational objective, providing a base for the other three objectives. Nazarenes can only pray, disciple, and give when they “know.” NMI leaders must diligently endeavor to educate the people about global needs and how they can meet those needs in Christ Jesus.

Nazarenes worldwide are sharing the mission stories of the church. Telling the story instills passion for global missions. When Jesus’ followers know what is at stake and hear how others are obeying God’s call to mission, they are challenged to participate as well.

NMI is committed to helping local churches tell mission stories. This is accomplished through a variety of resources and support for local churches.

Mission Education Print and Media Resources

NMI Mission Books

Adult Books: Six books in English are written each year that tell the story of global missions. The books are also available in audio format on CD. The books are sold in sets of six from the Nazarene Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site

<www.nph.com> and search for “NMI Missions Books.”

Youth Books: Three of the adult books in English are designated for youth each year, available in sets of three from Nazarene Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site <www.nph.com> and search for “NMI Missions Books.”

Children’s Books: Six books in English are written each year, three for all readers and three for advanced readers. They are available in sets of six from Nazarene

Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site <www.nph.com> and search for “NMI

Missions Books.”

18

NMI Curricula

International Mission Education Journal (IMEJ): This resource, based on the adult and children’s resources described below, is available in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Thai, and English. It is intended for congregations outside the USA/Canada

Region and for non-English-speaking congregations in the United States and Canada. The IMEJ in languages other than English can be accessed free on the

NMI Web site <www.nazarenemissions.org>. All translations are available through the regional offices.

Adult Resource: Living Mission contains lesson materials, stories, videos, and CAUSES (hands-on, practical mission projects). A subscription also provides access to the Living Mission Web site <www.livingmission.com> for additional resources. This resource is available from Nazarene Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site

<www.nph.com> and search for “Mission Education.”

Youth Resource: This resource helps youth develop a lifestyle of mission awareness and service. Mission CAUSES encourage youth to connect with specific hands-on projects around the world. This resource is available from Nazarene Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site <www.nph.com> and search for “Mission

Education.”

Children’s Resource: Children learn about global missions through 12 lessons each year. This is a five-year regional curriculum designed for children in elementary school. It includes a resource guide, a CD with 24 activity sheets, and PowerPoint slides of artwork from each of the six children’s missions books. This resource is available from Nazarene Publishing House. Go to the NPH Web site <www.nph.com> and search for “Mission Education.”

Nazarene Media Library is a Web site that contains a catalogue of DVDs, CDs, and

PDF files for the Church of the Nazarene. The library has resources for NMI, Global Mission, and Nazarene Compassionate Ministries. Go to the Web site

<www.nazarenemedialibrary.org>.

Non-English Resources: Several mission resources are available in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and Thai. Go to the NMI Web site <www.nazarenemissions.org> and click on “Educating.”

Online Resources

NMI Web Site: This is the primary resource for NMI leaders. Information is organized around the four objectives: praying, discipling, giving, and educating. Two helpful resources are the missionary profiles and the “A to Z Directory.” There are also sections for the local church and district NMI presidents. Go to the Web site

<www.nazarenemissions.org>.

19

Engage is a free, web-format magazine featuring missions content: stories about people, articles about our church’s mission strategies, photos, articles submitted by readers and other writers. The target audience is all Nazarenes around the world. The magazine site may be translated into multiple languages on the home page. For more information and to subscribe, go to the Engage magazine Web site <www.engagemagazine.com>.

Mission Connection is a free monthly resource exchange for NMI leaders within the local church. It is filled with ideas and strategies to help implement the NMI objectives. For more information and to subscribe, go to the NMI Web site <www.nazarenemissions.org> and click on “Educating”, then “Mission Connection.”

HeartLine is a free monthly newsletter designed for NMI leaders that is sent electronically to district NMI presidents and Global Council members. HeartLine contains a wide range of useful information and challenges for NMI leaders at all levels. It can be accessed on the NMI Web site at www.nazarenemissions.org under the “A to Z” Directory.”

JESUS Film Harvest Partners has an extensive Web site with stories of changed lives, reports, strategies, handouts, posters, etc., to use in local outreach. Go to www.jfhp.org. Also go to JESUS Film Ministry Trips

<www.jfhp.org/getinvolved/trips.cfm>.

Nazarene Compassionate Ministries (NCM) Web site includes news, stories, information, projects, child sponsorship, and giving opportunities. Go to www.ncm.org.

Global Mission Web site features lots of information about Nazarenes around the world, including easy links to the various ministries of Global Mission (i.e., NMI,

NCM, Work & Witness, Youth in Mission, Mission Corps, World Mission Broadcast, etc.). Go to www.globalmission.nazarene.org.

Missionary Home Assignment (Deputation)

What is deputation? When missionaries are on home assignment, they often travel to churches to speak about their work and share about what God is doing.

Purpose: One of the most effective ways of telling the mission story is to have missionaries speak to and interact with congregations. This will help bring the world to the church and is one of the important strategies to fulfill the “Educating” objective.

Scheduling: If possible, districts should help churches schedule a missionary.

Churches can contact the district or regional offices to help schedule other speakers. Be sure to include children and youth in the services with missionaries and mission speakers.

Offering and Accommodations: A church should give an offering for a missionary or mission speaker. A church should also provide lodging and meals for a missionary or mission speaker.

20

Bible Schools and Seminaries

Nazarene educational institutions around the world are training preachers, teachers, evangelists, nurses, and lay leaders. This education is essential to the success of evangelistic efforts. God uses these choice preachers, teachers, and laypeople to build His kingdom in their own areas. Therefore, our education work is vital for the preparation of international leaders and pastoral teams.

Please remember the students, faculty, and staff in prayer.

For a list of Nazarene global institutions, go to the NMI Web site: <www.nazarenemissions.org>, and click on “Educating.”

Other Resources

World Mission Broadcast Web site <www.worldmissionbroadcast.org>

Global Mission Mobilization Web site <http://mobilization.nazarene.org>

21